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The position of the Nazlet Khaterspecimen among prehistoric and modernAfrican and Levantine populations

Posted by big mike M on May 22, 2013 at 2:15 PM Comments comments (0)



Nazlet Khater man was the earliest modern human skeleton found near Luxor, in 1980. The remains was dated from between 35,000 and 30,000 years ago. The report regarding the racial affinity of this skeleton concludes: "Strong alveolar prognathism combined with fossa praenasalis in an African skull is suggestive of Negroid morphology.

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Libya and the Maghreb:

Posted by big mike M on May 21, 2013 at 10:55 AM Comments comments (0)

Libya and the Maghreb:

 

If the archaeology of the Sahara’s southern margins remains rela- tively poorly understood, the Maghreb has long been the focus of sustained activity focused on the Pleistocene/Holocene transition (Lubell 2000, 2005). Here and at Haua Fteah in northeastern Libya, the Iberomaurusian industry introduced in Chapter 7 continued to be made into the terminal Pleistocene (McBurney 1967; Close and Wendorf 1990). Several unusual features are of...

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Modern Europe's Genetic History Starts in Stone Age

Posted by big mike M on May 20, 2013 at 7:25 PM Comments comments (0)

Europeans as a people are younger than we thought, a new study suggests.

 

DNA recovered from ancient skeletons reveals that the genetic makeup of modern Europe was established around 4,500 B.C. in the mid-Neolithic—or 6,500 years ago—and not by the first farmers who arrived in the area around 7,500 years ago or by earlier hunter-gatherer groups. (Read about Europe's oldest known town.)

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The First Africans

Posted by big mike M on May 20, 2013 at 2:40 PM Comments comments (0)

Regular Middle Paleolithic inventories as well as Middle Paleolithic inventories of Aterian type have a long chronology in Morocco going back to MIS 6 and are interstratified in some sites. Their potential for detecting chrono-cultural patterns is low. The transition from the Middle to Upper Paleolithic, here termed Early Upper Paleolithic—at between 30 to 20 ka—remains a most enigmatic era. Scarce data from this period requires careful and fundamental reconsidering of human pr...

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Lakeside cemeteries in the Sahara: 5000 years of holocene population and environmental change.

Posted by big mike M on May 20, 2013 at 2:20 PM Comments comments (0)

http://ngm.nationalgeographic.com/2008/09/green-sahara/gwin-text.html


PLoS One. 2008 Aug 14;3(8):e2995.

Lakeside cemeteries in the Sahara: 5000 years of holocene population and environmental change.

Sereno PC et al.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

QUOTE:

____________________________________________________________________________

Approximately two hundred human...

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Divorcing the Late Upper Palaeolithic demographic histories of mtDNA haplogroups M1 and U6 in Africa

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http://www.biomedcentral.com/content/pdf/1471-2148-12-234.pdf

'Divorcing the Late Upper Palaeolithic demographic histories of mtDNA haplogroups M1 and U6 in Africa'

 

Erwan Pennarun, Toomas Kivisild, Ene Metspalu, Mait Metspalu, Tuuli Reisberg, Doron M Behar, Sacha C Jones and Richard Villems

 

BMC Evolutionary Biology 2012, 12:234

 

Abstract (provisional)

 

Background

A Southwest Asian origin and dispersal to Nor...

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DNA study shows Europeans share common ancestors who lived 1,000 years ago

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Whether they are a Serb and a Swiss, or a Finn and a Frenchman, any two Europeans are likely to have many common ancestors who lived around 1,000 years ago. A genomic survey of 2,257 people from 40 populations finds that people of European ancestry are more closely related to one another than previously thought, and could help to bring about new insights into European history.

 

The first efforts to trace human ancestry through DN...

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African migration/contribution into Europe

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Prehistoric contacts over the Straits of Gibraltar

indicated by genetic analysis of Iberian

Bronze Age cattle

http://www.pnas.org/content/102/24/8431.full.pdf+html?sid=8370fb44-581a-4cf7-bcaf-da0a09e388bb

Previously, the appearance of the Late Atlantic Neolithic culture had been placed at a significantly later date than the Egyptian culture, and this chronology and the cultural similarity were interpreted as implying that Egypt was the original source (14).

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Reconstructing ancient mitochondrial DNA links between Africa and Europe

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African gene flow into Europe in particular Neolithc times

http://genome.cshlp.org/content/22/5/821.full

 

Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) lineages of macro-haplogroup L (excluding the derived L3 branches M and N) represent the majority of the typical sub-Saharan mtDNA variability. In Europe, these mtDNAs account for <1% of the total but, when analyzed at the level of control region, they show no signals of ...

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